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SPaMCAST 444 ‚Äď Product Owner ‚Äď The Hard Role, QA Value, Work In Process Limits

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This week’s Software Process and Measurement Cast features our essay revisiting the product owner role. The product owner role is hard, often messed up and a great opportunity for improvement.

The second column features the return of Steve Tendon talking about Tame The Flow: Hyper-Productive Knowledge-Work Performance, The TameFlow Approach and Its Application to Scrum and Kanban published J Ross (buy a copy here). We tackle Chapter 17 which is titled Challenges of Work-State Work in Process Limits. WIP limits have their plusses and minuses when discussing hyper-productivity.  

Our third column this week is from Jeremy Berriault. Jeremy discusses how to show the value of QA and why knowing and showing value is important!   Jeremy  blogs at https://jberria.wordpress.com/  

 

Re-Read Saturday News

This week we tackle Chapter 6 of Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World by Brian J. Robertson published by Henry Holt and Company in 2015.   Chapter 6, Facilitating Governance, puts the ideas and processes defined in governance to work.

Catch up on the first four entries in the re-read

Week 1:  Logistics and Introduction

Week 2: Evolving Organization

Week 3: Distribution Authority

Week 4: Organizational Structure

Week 5: Governance

Week 6: Operations

Week 7: Facilitating Governance

Visit the Software Process and Measurement Cast blog to participate in this and previous re-reads.

 

A Call To Action

If you got a new idea this week while listening to the podcast, please give the SPaMCAST a short, honest review in iTunes.  Reviews help guide people to the cast!

Next SPaMCAST

SPaMCAST 445 features the return of a favorite, Capers Jones.  Capers and I talked about his new book, A Guide to Selecting Software Measures and Metrics. As usual, Capers was engaging, educational and controversial.  Spending time with Capers is always worthwhile!

Shameless Ad for my book!

Mastering Software Project Management: Best Practices, Tools and Techniques co-authored by Murali Chematuri and myself and published by J. Ross Publishing. We have received unsolicited reviews like the following: ‚ÄúThis book will prove that software projects should not be a tedious process, for you or your team.‚ÄĚ Support SPaMCAST by buying the book here. Available in English and Chinese.


Categories: Process Management

SPaMCAST 444 - Product Owner - The Hard Role, QA Value, Work In Process Limits

Software Process and Measurement Cast - Sun, 05/28/2017 - 22:00

This week’s Software Process and Measurement Cast features our essay revisiting the product owner role. The product owner role is hard, often messed up and a great opportunity for improvement.

The second column features the return of Steve Tendon talking about Tame The Flow: Hyper-Productive Knowledge-Work Performance, The TameFlow Approach and Its Application to Scrum and Kanban published J Ross (buy a copy here). We tackle Chapter 17 which is titled Challenges of Work-State Work in Process Limits. WIP limits have their plusses and minuses when discussing hyper-productivity.  

Our third column this week is from Jeremy Berriault. Jeremy discusses how to show the value of QA and why knowing and showing value is important!   Jeremy  blogs at https://jberria.wordpress.com/  

 

Re-Read Saturday News

This week we tackle Chapter 6 of Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World by Brian J. Robertson published by Henry Holt and Company in 2015.   Chapter 6, Facilitating Governance, puts the ideas and processes defined in governance to work.

Catch up on the first four entries in the re-read

Week 1:  Logistics and Introduction

Week 2: Evolving Organization

Week 3: Distribution Authority

Week 4: Organizational Structure

Week 5: Governance

Week 6: Operations

Week 7: Facilitating Governance

Visit the Software Process and Measurement Cast blog to participate in this and previous re-reads.

 

A Call To Action

If you got a new idea this week while listening to the podcast, please give the SPaMCAST a short, honest review in iTunes.  Reviews help guide people to the cast!

Next SPaMCAST

SPaMCAST 445 features the return of a favorite, Capers Jones.  Capers and I talked about his new book, A Guide to Selecting Software Measures and Metrics. As usual, Capers was engaging, educational and controversial.  Spending time with Capers is always worthwhile!

Shameless Ad for my book!

Mastering Software Project Management: Best Practices, Tools and Techniques co-authored by Murali Chematuri and myself and published by J. Ross Publishing. We have received unsolicited reviews like the following: ‚ÄúThis book will prove that software projects should not be a tedious process, for you or your team.‚ÄĚ Support SPaMCAST by buying the book here. Available in English and Chinese.

Categories: Process Management

SPaMCAST 444 - Product Owner - The Hard Role, QA Value, Work In Process Limits

Software Process and Measurement Cast - Sun, 05/28/2017 - 22:00

This week’s Software Process and Measurement Cast features our essay revisiting the product owner role. The product owner role is hard, often messed up and a great opportunity for improvement.

The second column features the return of Steve Tendon talking about Tame The Flow: Hyper-Productive Knowledge-Work Performance, The TameFlow Approach and Its Application to Scrum and Kanban published J Ross (buy a copy here). We tackle Chapter 17 which is titled Challenges of Work-State Work in Process Limits. WIP limits have their plusses and minuses when discussing hyper-productivity.  

Our third column this week is from Jeremy Berriault. Jeremy discusses how to show the value of QA and why knowing and showing value is important!   Jeremy  blogs at https://jberria.wordpress.com/  

 

Re-Read Saturday News

This week we tackle Chapter 6 of Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World by Brian J. Robertson published by Henry Holt and Company in 2015.   Chapter 6, Facilitating Governance, puts the ideas and processes defined in governance to work.

Catch up on the first four entries in the re-read

Week 1:  Logistics and Introduction

Week 2: Evolving Organization

Week 3: Distribution Authority

Week 4: Organizational Structure

Week 5: Governance

Week 6: Operations

Week 7: Facilitating Governance

Visit the Software Process and Measurement Cast blog to participate in this and previous re-reads.

 

A Call To Action

If you got a new idea this week while listening to the podcast, please give the SPaMCAST a short, honest review in iTunes.  Reviews help guide people to the cast!

Next SPaMCAST

SPaMCAST 445 features the return of a favorite, Capers Jones.  Capers and I talked about his new book, A Guide to Selecting Software Measures and Metrics. As usual, Capers was engaging, educational and controversial.  Spending time with Capers is always worthwhile!

Shameless Ad for my book!

Mastering Software Project Management: Best Practices, Tools and Techniques co-authored by Murali Chematuri and myself and published by J. Ross Publishing. We have received unsolicited reviews like the following: ‚ÄúThis book will prove that software projects should not be a tedious process, for you or your team.‚ÄĚ Support SPaMCAST by buying the book here. Available in English and Chinese.

Categories: Process Management

Projects and Products

Herding Cats - Glen Alleman - Sun, 05/28/2017 - 15:47

It's popular in the Agile world to speak of Products and their value creation and the notion that Projects are not needed for this. The notion of #NoProjects follows the same logic as #Noestimates. There are #NoPrinciples at the foundation of both these hashtags. Here's a nice summary of what is a project.

 

Projects Produce Products

It's that simple. When we speak of a product the fist question is how is that product development funded?  Does that funding have a period of performance? Does that funding have an upper limit? If the answer to any of these is Yes then the funding for the product is finite, it's bounded. 

Then ask, does the product result in a change to the environment, market, revenue stream, cost savings, anything? Yes, then the product and the project that manages those changes are connected.

Does the product participate in the execution of strategy? Yes? Then the Product is part of the Strategic Project.

The #NoProjects advocates, like the #NoEstimates advocates, fail to see both sides of how business works.

The value of any endevor cannot be determined unless the cost to acheive that value is also known. Cost and Value are inseperable.
Projects produce Products

Categories: Project Management

Holacracy: Re-read Week 7, Chapter 6 ‚Äď Facilitating Governance

Book Cover

Holacracy

This week we tackle Chapter 6 of Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World by Brian J. Robertson published by Henry Holt and Company in 2015.  Chapter 6, Facilitating Governance, puts the ideas and processes defined in governance to work.

The description of operations meetings as we discovered earlier in the book is fairly straightforward; however, the process is generally messier than the pristine words printed in the book suggest, especially when dealing with problems. ¬†The facilitator role in Holacracy is crucial¬†to actually get things done, but the role of the facilitator is different. ¬†In Holacracy, the role of the facilitator is to protect the process which allows people to take care of themselves, not to protect or support the people. ¬†A facilitator in Holacracy needs to override your instinct to be nice or polite and cut people off they speak out of turn. The facilitator must keep the process on track by ruthlessly cutting them off even at ‚Äúthe first intake of breath‚ÄĚ (Roberston‚Äôs suggestion). ¬†In other words, the facilitator role is not for the faint of heart. ¬†The person playing the role needs to be as neutral and impersonal as possible with the goal of keeping meeting explicitly on the processes rather than guiding it to an outcome. Recently when I was discussing Holacracy with a practitioner, this process absolutism was noted as the hardest part of actually ‚Äúdoing‚ÄĚ Holacracy and the biggest payoff.

One of the critical parts of the facilitator role is to determine what is valid to process during a governance meeting.  As noted in Chapter 4, governance meetings perform a very specific set of activities:

  1.      Creating, amending or moving roles with the circle (see Chapter 3)
  2.      Creating, amending or removing policies within the circle’s domain.
  3.      Electing circle members to fill elected rules facilitator, secretary, and representative link.
  4.      Creating amending or dissolving sub-circles.

For the proposal to be valid to process in a governance meeting, the tension/issue driving the proposal must somehow limit ones of the proposer‚Äôs roles and the goal of the proposal must be to remove that limit. The proposal may modify other roles as long as the reason is to help one of the proposer‚Äôs roles. The first filter the facilitator applies is to accept, reject or discard the proposal based on whether the¬†proposer can give a concrete example of how the proposal will¬†improve¬†his or her ability to express the purpose or accountabilities of one of their roles. Robertson points out that this ‚Äúshow me‚ÄĚ (my term for the rule) will filter out two types of proposals. First are attempts to improve everything, including things that aren‚Äôt the prospers to improve in the first place. Second are the proposals that would serve the proposer personally, but not the role they are stewarding in the organization. ¬†Remember that the facilitator role and governance are part of a process that is a steward for the process, not to ensure personal needs are met. ¬†

A substantial portion of the chapter is turned over to basic blocking and tackling mechanisms of facilitating in Holacracy.  

  1. The process: One tension/proposal at a time.

The facilitator gets one proposal at a time into active consideration. ¬†He/she then invites clarifying questions from other in the governance meeting. ¬†Clarifying questions are not reactions or statements. Once clarifying questions have been covered, a reaction round follows. ¬†Address one reaction at a time, round-robin style until all reactions are dealt with ¬†Reactions are directed at space not at the individual and no crosstalk is allowed. When all reactions have been stated the facilitator checks with the proposer to see whether they want or clarify the proposal. ¬†The facilitator, in this part of the process, needs to make sure that the proposer is focusing on his or her roles tension/issue and to ignore everything else if it doesn’t help with the specific tension there trying to address.

  1. The Process: Testing objections

After reacting to reactions (nice alliteration), the facilitator asks the assembled group whether they see any reasons why adopting proposal would move the goal of the circle backward.  At this point, the answer is an objection or no objection.  If objection, the person making the object needs to state objections.  Objections need to both explain why the proposal will move the circle backward and describe how the proposal would diminish the roles capacity to express its purpose or to enact its accountabilities.  The facilitator must immediately determine whether the objection is valid or not.  Robertson provides four criteria for determining whether an objective is valid or not.   Objections are valid if:

  1. If the proposal would hurt the circle.
  2. The objection is created by adopting the proposal and would not exist if the proposal was dropped.
  3. The objection arises from known (tangible) data or if based on a forecast/prediction there would not be time to react before harm occurred.
  4. If the proposal was adopted the objection could be processed as a proposal in its own right.

Robertson provides a decision tree on page 118 to help apply the rules.  It took reading the rules a few times for me to see the internal logic of the rules.  If the proposal hurts the circle by adoption or would cause a scenario in which the goal of the circle is negatively impacted it is valid to be processed.  The facilitator applies the rules so that the circle can recognize the validity of the objections.

Once all of the objections have been voiced the proposer is asked to integrate the valid objections into an amended proposal.  The facilitator performs a focusing role during the integration step by asking questions to determine if the proposal is reformed to address the original tension/problem while addressing the voiced objections.  Once the proposal is reformed the objection round is repeated until all objections are addressed or the proposal is withdrawn.

Governance processes are straightforward but the simplicity obscures the really hard part of making Holacracy work.  Applying Holacracy requires separating the person from the process which is where the role of the facilitator fits in.

Remember to buy a copy of Holacracy (use the link to help support and defray the costs of the Software Process and Measurement Cast blog and podcast).

Previous Entries in the re-read:

Week 1:  Logistics and Introduction

Week 2: Evolving Organization

Week 3: Distribution Authority

Week 4: Organization Structure

Week 5: Governance

Week 6: Operations


Categories: Process Management

Holacracy: Re-read Week 7, Chapter 6 ‚Äď Facilitating Governance

Book Cover

Holacracy

This week we tackle Chapter 6 of Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World by Brian J. Robertson published by Henry Holt and Company in 2015.  Chapter 6, Facilitating Governance, puts the ideas and processes defined in governance to work.

The description of operations meetings as we discovered earlier in the book is fairly straightforward; however, the process is generally messier than the pristine words printed in the book suggest, especially when dealing with problems. ¬†The facilitator role in Holacracy is crucial¬†to actually get things done, but the role of the facilitator is different. ¬†In Holacracy, the role of the facilitator is to protect the process which allows people to take care of themselves, not to protect or support the people. ¬†A facilitator in Holacracy needs to override your instinct to be nice or polite and cut people off they speak out of turn. The facilitator must keep the process on track by ruthlessly cutting them off even at ‚Äúthe first intake of breath‚ÄĚ (Roberston‚Äôs suggestion). ¬†In other words, the facilitator role is not for the faint of heart. ¬†The person playing the role needs to be as neutral and impersonal as possible with the goal of keeping meeting explicitly on the processes rather than guiding it to an outcome. Recently when I was discussing Holacracy with a practitioner, this process absolutism was noted as the hardest part of actually ‚Äúdoing‚ÄĚ Holacracy and the biggest payoff.

One of the critical parts of the facilitator role is to determine what is valid to process during a governance meeting.  As noted in Chapter 4, governance meetings perform a very specific set of activities:

  1.      Creating, amending or moving roles with the circle (see Chapter 3)
  2.      Creating, amending or removing policies within the circle’s domain.
  3.      Electing circle members to fill elected rules facilitator, secretary, and representative link.
  4.      Creating amending or dissolving sub-circles.

For the proposal to be valid to process in a governance meeting, the tension/issue driving the proposal must somehow limit ones of the proposer‚Äôs roles and the goal of the proposal must be to remove that limit. The proposal may modify other roles as long as the reason is to help one of the proposer‚Äôs roles. The first filter the facilitator applies is to accept, reject or discard the proposal based on whether the¬†proposer can give a concrete example of how the proposal will¬†improve¬†his or her ability to express the purpose or accountabilities of one of their roles. Robertson points out that this ‚Äúshow me‚ÄĚ (my term for the rule) will filter out two types of proposals. First are attempts to improve everything, including things that aren‚Äôt the prospers to improve in the first place. Second are the proposals that would serve the proposer personally, but not the role they are stewarding in the organization. ¬†Remember that the facilitator role and governance are part of a process that is a steward for the process, not to ensure personal needs are met. ¬†

A substantial portion of the chapter is turned over to basic blocking and tackling mechanisms of facilitating in Holacracy.  

  1. The process: One tension/proposal at a time.

The facilitator gets one proposal at a time into active consideration. ¬†He/she then invites clarifying questions from other in the governance meeting. ¬†Clarifying questions are not reactions or statements. Once clarifying questions have been covered, a reaction round follows. ¬†Address one reaction at a time, round-robin style until all reactions are dealt with ¬†Reactions are directed at space not at the individual and no crosstalk is allowed. When all reactions have been stated the facilitator checks with the proposer to see whether they want or clarify the proposal. ¬†The facilitator, in this part of the process, needs to make sure that the proposer is focusing on his or her roles tension/issue and to ignore everything else if it doesn’t help with the specific tension there trying to address.

  1. The Process: Testing objections

After reacting to reactions (nice alliteration), the facilitator asks the assembled group whether they see any reasons why adopting proposal would move the goal of the circle backward.  At this point, the answer is an objection or no objection.  If objection, the person making the object needs to state objections.  Objections need to both explain why the proposal will move the circle backward and describe how the proposal would diminish the roles capacity to express its purpose or to enact its accountabilities.  The facilitator must immediately determine whether the objection is valid or not.  Robertson provides four criteria for determining whether an objective is valid or not.   Objections are valid if:

  1. If the proposal would hurt the circle.
  2. The objection is created by adopting the proposal and would not exist if the proposal was dropped.
  3. The objection arises from known (tangible) data or if based on a forecast/prediction there would not be time to react before harm occurred.
  4. If the proposal was adopted the objection could be processed as a proposal in its own right.

Robertson provides a decision tree on page 118 to help apply the rules.  It took reading the rules a few times for me to see the internal logic of the rules.  If the proposal hurts the circle by adoption or would cause a scenario in which the goal of the circle is negatively impacted it is valid to be processed.  The facilitator applies the rules so that the circle can recognize the validity of the objections.

Once all of the objections have been voiced the proposer is asked to integrate the valid objections into an amended proposal.  The facilitator performs a focusing role during the integration step by asking questions to determine if the proposal is reformed to address the original tension/problem while addressing the voiced objections.  Once the proposal is reformed the objection round is repeated until all objections are addressed or the proposal is withdrawn.

Governance processes are straightforward but the simplicity obscures the really hard part of making Holacracy work.  Applying Holacracy requires separating the person from the process which is where the role of the facilitator fits in.

Remember to buy a copy of Holacracy (use the link to help support and defray the costs of the Software Process and Measurement Cast blog and podcast).

Previous Entries in the re-read:

Week 1:  Logistics and Introduction

Week 2: Evolving Organization

Week 3: Distribution Authority

Week 4: Organization Structure

Week 5: Governance

Week 6: Operations


Categories: Process Management

Quote of the Day

Herding Cats - Glen Alleman - Sat, 05/27/2017 - 14:56

"We confide in our strength, without boasting of it; we respect that of others, without fearing it."
Thomas Jefferson

Categories: Project Management

GraphQL-Europe: A trip to Berlin

Mark Needham - Sat, 05/27/2017 - 12:31

Last weekend my colleagues Will, Michael, Oskar, and I went to Berlin to spend Sunday at the GraphQL Europe conference in Berlin.

IMG 20170521 084449

Neo4j sponsored the conference as we’ve been experimenting with building a GraphQL to Neo4j integration and wanted to get some feedback from the community as well as learn what’s going on in GraphQL land.

Will and Michael have written about their experience where they talk more about the hackathon we hosted so I’ll cover it more from a personal perspective.

The first thing that stood out for me was how busy it was – I knew GraphQL was pretty hipster but I wasn’t expecting there to be ~ 300 attendees.

The venue was amazing – the nHow Hotel is located right next to the Spree River so there were great views to be had during the breaks. It also helped that it was really sunny for the whole day!

IMG 20170521 103636

I spent most of the day hanging out at the Neo4j booth which was good fun – several people pointed out that an integration between Neo4j and GraphQL made a lot of sense given that GraphQL talks about the application graph and Neo4j graphs in general.

I managed to attend a few of the talks, including one by Brooks Swinnerton from GitHub who announced that they’d be moving to GraphQL for v4 of their API.

The most interesting part of the talk for me was when Brooks said they’d directed requests for their REST API to the GraphQL one behind the scenes for a while now to check that it could handle the load.

GitHub is moving to GraphQL for v4 of our API because it offers significantly more flexibility for our integrators. The ability to define precisely the data you want‚ÄĒand only the data you want‚ÄĒis a powerful advantage over the REST API v3 endpoints.

I think twitter may be doing something similar based on this tweet by Tom Ashworth:

Heh. Twitter GraphQL is quietly serving more than 40 million queries per day. Tiny at Twitter scale but not a bad start.

— tom (@tgvashworth) May 9, 2017

From what I could tell the early pick up of GraphQL seems to be from the front end of applications – several of the attendees had attended ReactEurope a couple of days earlier – but micro services were mentioned in a few of the talks and it was suggested that GraphQL works well in this world as well.

It was a fun day out so thanks to the folks at Graphcool for organising!

The post GraphQL-Europe: A trip to Berlin appeared first on Mark Needham.

Categories: Programming

What's new from Firebase at Google I/O 2017

Google Code Blog - Fri, 05/26/2017 - 18:00
Originally posted on the Firebase Blog by Francis Ma, Firebase Group Product Manager

It's been an exciting year! Last May, we expanded Firebase into our unified app platform, building on the original backend-as-a-service and adding products to help developers grow their user base, as well as test and monetize their apps. Hearing from developers like Wattpad, who built an app using Firebase in only 3 weeks, makes all the hard work worthwhile.

We're thrilled by the initial response from the community, but we believe our journey is just getting started. Let's talk about some of the enhancements coming to Firebase today.

Integrating with Fabric

In January, we announced that we were welcoming the Fabric team to Firebase. Fabric initially grabbed our attention with their array of products, including the industry-leading crash reporting tool, Crashlytics. As we got to know the team better, we were even more impressed by how closely aligned our missions are: to help developers build better apps and grow successful businesses. Over the last several months, we've been working closely with the Fabric team to bring the best of our platforms together.

We plan to make Crashlytics the primary crash reporting product in Firebase. If you don't already use a crash reporting tool, we recommend you take a look at Crashlytics and see what it can do for you. You can get started by following the Fabric documentation.

Phone authentication comes to Firebase

Phone number authentication has been the biggest request for Firebase Authentication, so we're excited to announce that we've worked with the Fabric Digits team to bring phone auth to our platform. You can now let your users sign in with their phone numbers, in addition to traditional email/password or identity providers like Google or Facebook. This gives you a comprehensive authentication solution no matter who your users are or how they like to log in.

At the same time, the Fabric team will be retiring the Digits name and SDK. If you currently use Digits, over the next couple weeks we'll be rolling out the ability to link your existing Digits account with Firebase and swap in the Firebase SDK for the Digits SDK. Go to the Digits blog to learn more.

Introducing Firebase Performance Monitoring

We recognize that poor app performance and stability are the top reasons for users to leave bad ratings on your app and possibly churn altogether. As part of our effort to help you build better apps, we're pleased to announce the beta launch of Performance Monitoring.

Firebase Performance Monitoring is a new free tool that helps you understand when your user experience is being impacted by poorly performing code or challenging network conditions. You can learn more and get started with Performance Monitoring in the Firebase documentation.

More robust analytics

Analytics has been core to the Firebase platform since we launched last I/O. We know that understanding your users is the number one way to make your app successful, so we're continuing to invest in improving our analytics product.

First off, you may notice that you're starting to see the name "Google Analytics for Firebase" around our documentation. Our analytics solution was built in conjunction with the Google Analytics team, and the reports are available both in the Firebase console and the Google Analytics interface. So, we're renaming Firebase Analytics to Google Analytics for Firebase, to reflect that your app analytics data are shared across both.

For those of you who monetize your app with AdMob, we've started sharing data between the two platforms, helping you understand the true lifetime value (LTV) of your users, from both purchases and AdMob revenue. You'll see these new insights surfaced in the updated Analytics dashboard.

Many of you have also asked for analytics insights into custom events and parameters. Starting today, you can register up to 50 custom event parameters and see their details in your Analytics reports. Learn more about custom parameter reporting.

Firebase for all - iOS, games, and open source

Firebase's mission is to help all developers build better apps. In that spirit, today we're announcing expanded platform and vertical support for Firebase.

First of all, as Swift has become the preferred language for many iOS developers, we've updated our SDK to handle Swift language nuances, making Swift development a native experience on Firebase.

We've also improved Firebase Cloud Messaging by adding support for token-based authentication for APNs, and greatly simplifying the connection and registration logic in the client SDK.

Second, we've heard from our game developer community that one of the most important stats you monitor is frames per second (FPS). So, we've built Game Loop support & FPS monitoring into Test Lab for Android, allowing you to evaluate your game's frame rate before you deploy. Coupled with the addition of Unity plugins and a C++ SDK, which we announced at GDC this year, we think that Firebase is a great option for game developers. To see an example of a game built on top of Firebase, check out our Mecha Hamster app on Github.

Finally, we've taken a big first step towards open sourcing our SDKs. We believe in open source software, not only because transparency is an important goal, but also because we know that the greatest innovation happens when we all collaborate. You can view our new repos on our open sourceproject page and learn more about our decision in this blog post.

Dynamic Hosting with Cloud Functions for Firebase

In March, we launched Cloud Functions for Firebase, which lets you run custom backend code in response to events triggered by Firebase features and HTTP requests. This lets you do things like send a notification when a user signs up or automatically create thumbnails when an image is uploaded to Cloud Storage.

Today, in an effort to better serve our web developer community, we're expanding Firebase Hosting to integrate with Cloud Functions. This means that, in addition to serving static assets for your web app, you can now serve dynamic content, generated by Cloud Functions, through Firebase Hosting. For those of you building progressive web apps, Firebase Hosting + Cloud Functions allows you to go completely server-less. You can learn more by visiting our documentation.

Firebase Alpha program and what's next

Our goal is to build the best developer experience: easy-to-use products, great documentation, and intuitive APIs. And the best resource that we have for improving Firebase is you! Your questions and feedback continuously push us to make Firebase better.

In light of that, we're excited to announce a Firebase Alpha program, where you will have the opportunity to test the cutting edge of our products. Things might not be perfect (in fact, we can almost guarantee they won't be), but by participating in the alpha community, you'll help define the future of Firebase. If you want to get involved, please register your interest in the Firebase Alpha form.

Thank you for your support, enthusiasm, and, most importantly, feedback. The Firebase community is the reason that we've been able to grow and improve our platform at such an incredible pace over the last year. We're excited to continue working with you to build simple, intuitive products for developing apps and growing mobile businesses. To get started with Firebase today, visit our newly redesigned website. We're excited to see what you build!

Categories: Programming

Meet 5 Android developers working to improve lives around the world

Android Developers Blog - Fri, 05/26/2017 - 17:00
.asset img { width: 200px; text-align: center; padding: 0; border: 0; margin: auto; display: block; } .caption { text-align: center; font-size: 6pts; font-style: italic; padding: 10px 0 0 0; margin: 0; border: 0; } .use { text-align: center; font-size: 6pts; padding:10px 0 0 0; margin: 0; border: 0; .stars { text-align: center; } Posted by Maxim Mai, Apps Partnerships, Google Play

Last Thursday at Google I/O 2017, we announced the winners of this year's Google Play Awards. Grab some popcorn and watch the award ceremony, we think it's just as fun as The Oscars. This year, we included a category to celebrate the achievements of developers who publish outstanding apps that have positive social impact.

In introducing this awards category, we were inspired by the UN's 17 Sustainable Development Goals. With the ability to reach over 1 billion active Android devices around the world, we think that app developers have a tremendous opportunity to impact Zero Hunger (SDG #2), Good Health and Wellbeing (SDG #3) and Quality Education (SDG #4), and many others. Read on to find out more about how this year's winner and finalists and impacting these goals.

Get in touch about your social impact app or game

Our work in supporting developer success in this area on Android and Google Play is just beginning. We would like to encourage Android developers with a focus on social impact to get in touch with us here at Google Play and to tell us about their app or game. It doesn't matter where you are based, what problems you are solving, or which countries you are targeting, we would like to hear your story and maybe we can help you grow faster and improve your app's quality.

Social impact winner & finalists in the 2017 Google Play Awards
Categories: Programming

Meet 5 Android developers working to improve lives around the world

Android Developers Blog - Fri, 05/26/2017 - 17:00
.asset img { width: 200px; text-align: center; padding: 0; border: 0; margin: auto; display: block; } .caption { text-align: center; font-size: 6pts; font-style: italic; padding: 10px 0 0 0; margin: 0; border: 0; } .use { text-align: center; font-size: 6pts; padding:10px 0 0 0; margin: 0; border: 0; .stars { text-align: center; } Posted by Maxim Mai, Apps Partnerships, Google Play

Last Thursday at Google I/O 2017, we announced the winners of this year's Google Play Awards. Grab some popcorn and watch the award ceremony, we think it's just as fun as The Oscars. This year, we included a category to celebrate the achievements of developers who publish outstanding apps that have positive social impact.

In introducing this awards category, we were inspired by the UN's 17 Sustainable Development Goals. With the ability to reach over 1 billion active Android devices around the world, we think that app developers have a tremendous opportunity to impact Zero Hunger (SDG #2), Good Health and Wellbeing (SDG #3) and Quality Education (SDG #4), and many others. Read on to find out more about how this year's winner and finalists and impacting these goals.

Get in touch about your social impact app or game

Our work in supporting developer success in this area on Android and Google Play is just beginning. We would like to encourage Android developers with a focus on social impact to get in touch with us here at Google Play and to tell us about their app or game. It doesn't matter where you are based, what problems you are solving, or which countries you are targeting, we would like to hear your story and maybe we can help you grow faster and improve your app's quality.

Social impact winner & finalists in the 2017 Google Play Awards
Categories: Programming

Stuff The Internet Says On Scalability For May 26th, 2017

Hey, it's HighScalability time:

 

 

Sport imitating tech. Cloud Computing chases down Classic Empire to win...the Preakness. (Daily News)
If you like this sort of Stuff then please support me on Patreon.
  • 42%: increase US wireless traffic since 2015; 44: age of Ethernet; $18.5m: low cost of Target data breach; 25 million: record set from Library of Congress; 98%: WannaCry infections on Windows 7; 100 terabytes: daily Pinterest logging; 2020: when Microsoft will have DNA storage in the cloud; 220 μm: size of microbots; 2 billion: lines of code in Google repository; 40%+: esports industry growth; 

  • Quotable Quotes:
    • @Werner: There is no compression algorithm for experience.
    • @colinmckerrache: We just crossed over 2m EVs on the road. So yeah, second million took just under 18 months. Next million in about 10 months.
    • @swardley: When discussing China, stop thinking cheap labour, communism & copying ... to understand changes, start thinking World's largest VC.
    • @JOTB17: "Cars generate more than 4Tb of data a day, humans are becoming irrelevant in data collection"
Categories: Architecture

Asking Questions: 7 Behaviors to Avoid

Questions, like most tools, can be used correctly or incorrectly.  A hammer used on a nail or on a screw is still a hammer; however, in most circumstances, we would debate the effectiveness of the hammer when used to insert a screw.  Questions are no different than our proverbial hammer.  Used well they can generate information or shape behavior; used incorrectly they can generate misinformation and friction. When questions are used for coaching and mentoring there are a number of poor practices that should be avoided:

  1. Actively listen to the answer.  Really listening generates a connection between the parties in the conversation.  Listening also helps to ensure you don’t appear stupid if you don’t listen to the answer.  How many times have you heard someone ask the same question again because they weren’t really listening?  It is infuriating.
  2. If you don’t want to hear the answer, don’t ask the question.  This is a corollary to listening, but far darker.  Note: Not wanting to listen to an answer is different than being afraid of the answer.
  3. Don’t expect or imply exposition if you ask yes/no questions.  Some questioners will ask a yes/or no question and then expect the person answering the question to keep going or worse jump to a conclusion about why the person answered the question the way they did.  If you want more, ask why.
  4. Try not to talk when in moments of silence.  Silence is a questioner’s friend (but a really insightful answer is his or her best friend).  After the person answering the question stops talking continue listening. Nature abhors both a vacuum and silence; if you don’t fill the silence the person answering the question will read silence as a signal that you want them to continue.
  5. Don’t go out of your way to irritate the person you are talking with.  Most coaching and mentoring are scenarios should not be patterned after aggressive television or radio interview shows.  Spectacle, while interesting entertainment, will not help someone you are coaching or mentoring to have an epiphany and many cause them to withdraw.
  6. It‚Äôs not about YOU! You are asking someone else what they know, think or feel. ¬†What you know, think, or feel might be useful scripting or phrasing the question, your goal is not to put your words in their mouth. ¬†Be very careful that how you ask a question does not cause a specific answer unless you are trying to make that happen. ¬†This form of questioning is very prevalent in legal proceedings (go listen to an actual court case — not Law and Order), but is far less useful during an agile retrospective. ¬†
  7. Rhetorical questions aren‚Äôt really questions. Rhetorical questions are a great presentation device but are really statements representing what the person using them believes. ¬†They are useful for establishing a line in the sand and then daring the listener to cross the line. ¬†An example of a rhetorical question asked by George Carlin was, ‚ÄúIsn’t it a bit unnerving that doctors call what they do ‘practice’?” A great tool to make a statement, but not useful to elicit an open conversation.

When I go out to mow the lawn, I rarely bring my hammer with me. ¬†I do bring my lawnmower, headphones, and a large screwdriver (for popping weeds out the lawn ‚Äď pretty darn effective). Using the right tool for the right mission increases effectiveness and efficiency. ¬†Using the right questions and using the right questions in the right way have the same effect! ¬†¬†

Other entries in the Asking Question Theme:

Asking Questions: A Coach’s Super Power or Kryptonite

Asking Questions: Many Types of Questions

Asking Questions: Hints for Improving Your Question Making Skills

 


Categories: Process Management

Android Studio 3.0 Canary 1

Android Developers Blog - Thu, 05/25/2017 - 21:58
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By Jamal Eason, Product Manager, Android

Just in time for Google I/O 2017, we're providing a sneak peak of Android Studio 3.0 - available to download today on our canary release channel. Android Studio's our official IDE, purpose-built for Android, and we keep increasing our investment. The feature set in Android Studio is focused on accelerating your app development flow and providing the latest tools built for the Android platform.

To accelerate your development flow, Android Studio 3.0 includes three major features: a new suite of app performance profiling tools to quickly diagnose performance issues, support for the Kotlin programming language, and increased Gradle build speeds for large sized app projects. Android Studio 3.0 also tightly integrates with Android platform development with these additional key features: support for Instant App development, inclusion of the Google Play Store in the Android O emulator system images, and new wizards for Android O development. Overall, this first canary release of Android Studio 3.0 has 20+ new features.

We have been quietly iterating on many of these features as part of the Android Studio 2.4 Canaries. Today we are renumbering the release to Android Studio 3.0 after recognizing that we added many significant features, and that we had to introduce a rare breaking change in the Android Gradle Plugin to improve scalability and build times. If you want to target Android O, create an Instant App, start developing with the Kotlin language or use the latest in Android app performance tools to improve your app quality then you should download Android Studio 3.0 Canary 1 today.
What's New in Android Development Tools - Google I/O '17


Check out the the list below organized into key developer flow for the details of the new features in this first canary release of Android Studio 3.0.

Develop
  • Kotlin Programming Language - By popular request, Android Studio 3.0 now includes support for Kotlin. With this new language support, you can seamlessly add Kotlin code next to your existing Android app code and have access to all the great development tools found in Android Studio. You can choose to add Kotlin to your project using the built-in conversion tool found under Code ‚Üí Convert Java File to Kotlin File, or you choose to create a Kotlin enabled project with the New Project Wizard. Lean more about Kotlin language support in Android and Android Studio.

Kotlin Language Conversion in Android Studio

  • Java 8 Language features - We are continuing to evolve the support for Java 8 language features and APIs. With the recent deprecation of the Jack toolchain and migration to the javac based toolchain, you have access to features such as Instant Run for projects using the Java 8 language features in Android Studio. To update your project to support the new Java 8 Language toolchain, simply update your Source and Target compatibility levels to 1.8 in the Project Structure dialog. Learn more.
Update Project Structure Dialogue for Java 8 Language



  • Layout Editor - With this Android Studio release, you will find additional enhancements to the Layout Editor. We have updated the component tree with better drag-and-drop view insertions, and a new error panel. In coordination with an update to ConstraintLayout, the Layout Editor also supports creating view Barriers, creating Groups, and enhances Chain Creation. Learn more.
Layout Editor Component Tree & Warning Panel


  • Adaptive Icon Wizard - Android O introduces adaptive launcher icons, which can display in different shapes across different Android devices. The new Adaptive Launcher Icon wizard creates the new and legacy launcher icon assets and provides previews of how your adaptive icon will look on different launcher screen icon masks. Create a new asset by right-clicking on the /res folder in your project then navigate to ‚Üí New ‚Üí Image Asset ‚Üí Launcher Icons (Adaptive and Legacy) Learn more.
Adaptive Icon Wizard


  • XML Fonts & Downloadable Fonts - Adding custom fonts to your app (available when targeting Android O) is now even easier with the XML fonts preview and font selection tools in Android Studio. You can can also create a downloadable font resource for your app. Using downloadable fonts allows you to use a custom font in your app while avoiding the need to bundle in a font resource into your APK. To use downloadable fonts, ensure that you device or emulator is running Google Play Services v11.2.63 or higher. Learn more.
Downloadable Fonts Resource Picker
XML Fonts Preview



  • Android Things Support - With Android Studio 3.0, you can start developing on Android Things with a new set of templates in the New Project wizard and the New Module wizard. Android Things allows you to extend your Android development knowledge into the Internet of Things (IoT) device category. Learn more.

Android Things New Module Wizard 



  • IntelliJ Platform Update: Android Studio 3.0 Canary 1 includes the IntelliJ 2017.1 release, which has features such as Java 8 language refactoring, parameter hints, semantic highlighting, draggable breakpoints, enhanced version control search, and more. Learn more.

Build
  • Instant App Support - With Android Studio 3.0, you can create Instant Apps in your project. Instant Apps are lightweight Android apps that your users can immediately run without installation. To support this, Android Studio introduces two new module types: instant app and feature. Combined with a new "Modularize" refactoring action and the App Links Assistant, Android Studio can help you extend your app into an Instant App. To use you can use the New Module Wizard or right-click on a class and navigate to: Refactor ‚Üí Modularize Learn more.

Instant App Module Wizard


  • Build Speed Improvements - We are continuing to invest in making build speeds faster. For this release, we focused on improving speed for projects that have many modules. To achieve these speed improvements and to support future enhancements, we have made breaking API changes to the Android Gradle plugin used by Android Studio. If you depended on APIs provided by the previous plugin you should validate compatibility with the new plugin and migrate applicable APIs. To test, update the plugin version in your build.gradle file. Learn more.



build.gradle
dependencies {
   classpath 'com.android.tools.build:gradle:3.0.0-alpha1'
}
  • Google's Maven Repository - Also, by popular request, we are now distributing the Android Support Library maven dependencies outside of the Android SDK Manager in a brand new Maven repository. For those developing with a Continuous Integration (CI) system, this should make Maven dependency management easier. Used in combination with the latest command line SDK Manager tool and Gradle, CI builds should be easier to manage with Google's Maven Repository. To use the the new Maven location, add the following url to your app module's build.gradle file. Learn more.
build.gradle
repositories {
   maven {
       url "https://maven.google.com"
   }
}



    Test & Debug
    • Google Play System Images - Along with the update to the Android O Beta release, we updated the Android Emulator O system images to include the Google Play Store. Bundling in the Google Play store allows you to do end-to-end testing of apps with Google Play, and provides a convenient way to keep Google Play services up-to-date in your Android Virtual Device (AVD). Just as Google Play services updates on physical devices, you can trigger the same updates on your AVDs.
    Google Play Store in Android Emulator


    Update Google Play Services in Android Emulator



    To ensure app security and a consistent experience with physical devices, the emulator system images with the Google Play store included are signed with a release key. This means you will not be able to get elevated privileges. If you require elevated privileges (root) to aid with your app troubleshooting, you can use the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) emulator system images that do not include Google apps or services. To get started, make sure you are using Android Emulator v26.1+, the latest system images API 24+ and then create a new AVD with a Google Play icon next to the device definition. Learn more.

    Android Virtual Device Manager with Google Play Store Support 




    • OpenGL ES 3.0 Support in Android Emulator - As a part of our ongoing investment in making your development experience fast, the latest version of the Android Emulator has OpenGL ES 3.0 support for Android O system images along with significant improvements in OpenGL ES 2.0 graphics performance for older emulator system images. Most modern graphics cards on all operating systems support OpenGL ES 2.0 acceleration. To use OpenGL ES 3.0 with the Android Emulator, your development machine needs a host GPU graphics card that supports OpenGL 3.2 or higher on Microsoft¬ģ Windows¬ģ or Linux (with Apple MacOS¬ģ support coming in the future). Learn more.


    OpenGL ES 3.0 in Android Emulator



    • App Bug Reporter in Android Emulator - To help in documenting bugs in your app, we have added an easier way to generate a bug report with all the necessary configuration settings and space to capture your repro steps. Additionally, if you want to share a specific emulator bug with the Android team, we have also added a link to quickly generate a bug on the Android Issue Tracker. To use this feature, navigate to the Emulator Tool Bar ‚Üí Extended Controls ‚Üí Help ‚Üí Emulator Help ‚Üí File a Bug. Learn more.

    App Bug Reporting in Android Emulator

    • Proxy Support in Android - For those who need to use a HTTP proxy to access the Internet, we have added a user interface to manage the proxy settings used by the emulator. By default, the Android Emulator will now use the settings from Android Studio, but you can override these settings for your network setup. To configure navigation to the Extended Controls ‚Üí Settings ‚Üí Proxy.
    Android Emulator Proxy Settings

    • Android Wear Rotary Controls in Android Emulator - The Android Emulator now supports rotary controls for the Android Wear 2.0 emulator system image. It is now easier to test your apps that target Android Wear devices that include rotary input scrolling. To enable, create an Emulator AVD that targets Android Wear, and the Rotary Input panel should appear under Extended controls. Learn more.

    Rotary input in Android Emulator


    • APK Debugging - For those of you who just want to debug an APK without building your project in Android Studio, the Android Studio 3.0 release now has the ability to debug an arbitrary APK. This functionally is especially helpful for those who develop your Android C++ code in another development environment, but want to debug and analyze the APK in the context of Android Studio. As long as you have a debuggable version of your APK, you can use the new APK Debugging features to analyze, profile & debug the APK. Moreover, if you have access to the sources of your APK, you can link the source to the APK debugging flow for a higher fidelity debugging process. Get started by simply selecting Profile or debug APK from the Android Studio Welcome Screen or File ‚Üí Profile or debug APKLearn More.

    Profile or Debug an APK

    APK Debugging

    • Layout Inspector - You will find that the Layout Inspector has a few additional enhancements in Android Studio 3.0 that make it easier to debug issues in your app layouts. A couple of the enhancements include better grouping of properties into common categories, as well as search functionality in both the View Tree and Properties Panels. While an application is running, access the Layout Inspector via Tools ‚Üí Android ‚Üí Layout Inspector. Learn more.
    Layout Inspector

    • Device File Explorer - Ported from DDMS into Android Studio by popular demand, the new Device File Explorer allows you to view the file and directory structure of your Android device or emulator. As you are testing your app, you can now quickly preview and modify app data files directly in Android Studio. Learn more.

    Device File Explorer


    Optimize
    • Android Profiler - Android Studio 3.0 includes a brand new suite of tools to help debug performance problems in your app. We completely rewrote the previous set of Android Monitor tools, and replaced them with the Android Profiler. Once you deploy your app to a running device or emulator, click on the Android Profiler tab and you will now have access to a real-time & unified view of the CPU, Memory, & Network activity for your app. Each of the performance events are mapped to the UI event timeline which highlights touch events, key presses, and activity changes so that you have more context on when and why a certain event happened.  Click on each timeline to dig into each performance aspect of your app. Learn more

    Android Profiler - Combined timeline view.
    • CPU Profiler - Unnecessary CPU processing and load spikes are symptoms of poor app performance. With the CPU Profiler, you can analyze the CPU thread usage of your app by triggering a sample or instrumented CPU trace. At this point, you can troubleshoot CPU performance issues using a variety of data views and filters built into the CPU Profiler. Learn more.

    CPU Profiler


    • Memory Profiler - Using memory inefficiently can lead to many device problems ranging from a janky UI to low memory events. The Memory Profiler combines the functionality of the previous Heap Viewer and Allocation Tracker in one rich interface to help debug memory usage problems in your app. You can diagnose a range of memory issues by analyzing memory allocations, heap dumps and more. Learn more.

    Memory Profiler


    • Network Profiler - Optimizing foreground and background network usage in your app can lead to a more performant app and lower app data usage. The network profiler allows you to monitor the network activity of your app, inspect the payload of each of your network requests, and link back to the line of source code that generated the network request. Currently, the network profiler works with HttpURLConnection, OkHttp, and Volley network libraries. The network profiler is an advanced analysis feature that can be enabled on Pre-Android O devices & emulators by selecting Enable Advanced Profiling in the Profiling Tab in the Run Configuration box. In addition to enabling network request and payload analysis, this checkbox enables event collection at the top level, memory object count, and memory garbage collection. For Android O-based devices and emulator, just deploy your app. Learn more.
    Network Profiler



    Network Profiler Setup for Pre- Android O Devices

    • APK Analyzer Improvements - In Android Studio 3.0, we have added some additional enhancements to the APK Analyzer to help you further optimize the size of your APK. With this feature update, you can now analyze Instant App zip files & AARs, and view dex bytecode of classes & methods. You can also generate Proguard configuration rules and load Proguard mapping files in the dex viewer. Learn more.

    APK Analyzer





    To recap, Android Studio 3.0 Canary 1 includes these new major features: 

    Develop


    Build


    Test & Debug

    Optimize
    Check out the release notes for more details.
    Android DevByte - What’s New in Android Studio 3.0 Canary 1
    Getting Started Download

    If you are using a previous version of Android Studio, you can install Android Studio 3.0 Canary 1 alongside your stable version. You can download this update from the official Android Studio Preview download page. As mention in this blog, there are some breaking Gradle Plugin API changes to support new features in the IDE. Therefore, you should also update your Android Gradle plugin version to 3.0.0-alpha1 in your current project to test and validate your app project setup.

    We appreciate any feedback on things you like, issues or features you would like to see. If you find a bug or issue, feel free to file an issue. Connect with us -- the Android Studio development team ‚Äź on our Google+ page or on Twitter.

    Categories: Programming

    Welcome to your New Home on Android TV

    Android Developers Blog - Thu, 05/25/2017 - 18:00
    .image img { width: 100%; padding: 10px 0; margin: 0; border: 0; } Posted by Paul Saxman, Android Devices and Media Developer Relations Lead

    Android TV brings rich app experiences and entertainment to the biggest screen in your house, and with Android O, we’re making it even easier for users to access content from their favorite apps. We’ve built a new, content-centric home screen experience for Android TV, and we're bringing the Google Assistant to the platform as well. These features put content that users want to access a few clicks, or spoken words, away.

    The New Android TV Home Screen

    The new Android TV home screen organizes video content into channels and programs in a way that’s familiar to TV viewers. Each Android TV app can publish multiple channels, which are represented as rows of programs on the home screen. Apps add relevant programs on each channel, and update these programs and channels as users access content or when new content is available. To help engage users, programs can include a video preview, which is automatically played when a user focuses on a program. Users can configure which channels they wish to see on the home screen, and the ordering of channels, so the themes and shows they’re interested in are quick and easy to access.

    In addition to channels for you app, the top of the new Android TV home screen includes a quick launch bar for users' favorite apps, and a special Watch Next channel. This channel contains programs based on the viewing habits of the user.

    The APIs for creating and maintaining channels and programs are part of the TvProvider APIs, which are distributed as an Android Support Library module with Android O. To get started using these APIs, visit the Android O Developer Preview site for an overview, and try out the Android TV Channels and Programs codelab for a first-hand experience building an Android TV app for Android O.

    Later this year, Nexus Players will receive the new Android TV home experience as an OTA update. If you wish build and test apps for the new interface today, however, you can use the Android TV emulator or Nexus Player device images that are part of the latest Android O Developer Preview.

    The Google Assistant on Android TV

    The Google Assistant on Android TV, coming later this year, will allow users to quickly find and access content using their voice. Because the Assistant is context-aware, it can help users narrow down what content to play. Users will also be able access the Assistant to control playback, even while a video or music is playing. And since the Assistant can control compatible smart home devices, a simple voice request can dim the lights to create an ideal movie viewing environment. When the Google Assistant comes to Android TV, it will launch in the US on Android devices running M, N, and O.

    We're looking forward to seeing how developers take advantage of the new Android TV home screen. We welcome feedback, so please visit the Android TV Developer Community on G+ to share you thoughts and ideas!

    Categories: Programming

    Request a professional app translation from the Google Play Console and reach new users

    Android Developers Blog - Thu, 05/25/2017 - 16:52
    .post-content img { border: 0 0 0 0; margin: 0 0 0 0; padding: 20px 0 10px 0; max-width: 100%; } b { color: gold; } .stars { color: gold; text-align: center; } .use { font-style: italic; font-size: 8pt; text-align: center; } Posted by Rahim Nathwani, Product Manager, Google Play
    Localizing your app or game is an important step in allowing you to reach the widest possible audience. It helps you increase downloads and provide better experiences for your audience.
    To help do this, Google Play offers an app translation service. The service, by professional linguists, can translate app user interface strings, Play Store text, in-app products and universal app campaign ads. We've made the app translation service available directly from inside the Google Play Console, making it easy and quick to get started.
    • Choose from a selection of professional translation vendors.
    • Order, receive and apply translations, without leaving the Play Console.
    • Pay online with Google Wallet.
    • Translations from your previous orders (if any) are reused, so you never pay for the same translation twice. Great if you release new versions frequently.
    Using the app translation service to translate a typical app and store description into one language may cost around US$50. (cost depends on the amount of text and languages).
    Find out more and get started with the app translation service.

    How useful did you find this blogpost? ‚ėÖ ‚ėÖ ‚ėÖ ‚ėÖ ‚ėÖ
    Categories: Programming

    I Smell Dysfunction

    Herding Cats - Glen Alleman - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 21:57

    Screen Shot 2017-05-24 at 11.11.29 AMA popular phrase in some agile areas is 

    X is the Smell of Dysfunction. Y will fix that, usually by NOT doing some established principle known to work, only if you knew how to make it work.

    Estimates, governance, planning, architecture, financial forecasting - pick you poison.

    One naive response to this smell of dysfunction is to conjecture a solution with no evidence that the problem OR the solution have any principles to be based on that will fix the observed problem.

    Let's not do X and the smell will be removed is a common approach. Common at least when the understanding of how to solve problems is missing

    The first failure mode of this logic is we don't actually know what the dysfunction is before conjectured we have a solution.

    Next, comes the naive approach of asking Five Whys without actually understanding how the process of Root Cause Analysis works.

    Asking why is a necessary step, but far from sufficient.

    • What condition allowed the dysfunction to occur?
    • What action occurred that created the dysfunction?

    The notion of Condition and Action created an Effect is the basis of Root Cause Analysis using the Apollo method. Without a Root Cause Analysis, any suggested fix for the dysfunction is bogus. You don't even know what the problem is, let alone that the solution will fix that problem or any problem.

    So when you see a NO in front of some word, like #NoEstimates, #NoProjects, #NoManagement, and you don't see the Root Cause Analysis, and a list of testable corrective actions, then ignore anything from that point on. It's either bogus or a hoax.

    So read Seven Steps to Effective Problem Solving and start solving problems rather than listening to unsubstantiated claims of how that problem could be solved. We have a saying (actually we have many sayings) in our Software Intensive System of Systems world ...

    Unicorn

    That's a Unicorn solution - meaning only if you believe in Unicorns will that cockamamy idea work

    And if you work in our space and defense domain, you'll recognize the uniformed version of the unicorn solution. It's called the Good Idea Fairy.

    Good Idea Fairy

    Related articles Are Estimates Really The Smell of Dysfunction? Estimating and Making Decisions in Presence of Uncertainty The Bad Apple Syndrome in Process Improvement Carl Sagan's BS Detector Making Conjectures Without Testable Outcomes
    Categories: Project Management

    Request a professional app translation from the Google Play Console and reach new users

    Android Developers Blog - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 18:45
    .post-content img { border: 0 0 0 0; margin: 0 0 0 0; padding: 20px 0 10px 0; max-width: 100%; } .stars { color: gold; text-align: center; } .use { font-style: italic; font-size: 8pt; text-align: center; } Posted by Rahim Nathwani, Product Manager, Google Play
    Localizing your app or game is an important step in allowing you to reach the widest possible audience. It helps you increase downloads and provide better experiences for your audience.
    To help do this, Google Play offers an app translation service. The service, by professional linguists, can translate app user interface strings, Play Store text, in-app products and universal app campaign ads. We've made the app translation service available directly from inside the Google Play Console, making it easy and quick to get started.
    • Choose from a selection of professional translation vendors.
    • Order, receive and apply translations, without leaving the Play Console.
    • Pay online with Google Wallet.
    • Translations from your previous orders (if any) are reused, so you never pay for the same translation twice. Great if you release new versions frequently.
    Using the app translation service to translate a typical app and store description into one language may cost around US$50. (cost depends on the amount of text and languages).
    Find out more and get started with the app translation service.

    How useful did you find this blogpost? ‚ėÖ ‚ėÖ ‚ėÖ ‚ėÖ ‚ėÖ
    Categories: Programming

    Production ready AWS ECS (EC2 Container Service)

    Xebia Blog - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 16:59

    Are you looking to run Docker containers on AWS? Or are you looking to use AWS ECS (EC2 Container Service)? Does it need to be production ready? If so, then speed up your process and be ready today by looking at my GitHub repository on ECS. It contains infrastructure as code with Terraform for a […]

    The post Production ready AWS ECS (EC2 Container Service) appeared first on Xebia Blog.

    Announcing the Women Techmakers Udacity Scholarship

    Google Code Blog - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 16:49
    .post-content img { border: 0 0 0 0; margin: 0 0 0 0; padding: 10px 0 0 0; } Posted by Amy Schapiro and the Women Techmakers team

    The community of women in tech is growing in numbers and influence, which we witnessed firsthand just last week at Google I/O, Google's biggest developer conference of the year. Our total attendees were 25% women, thanks in large part to creating a number of cross-industry partnerships supporting women developer communities. 25% of the speakers were women as well.

    We know working together as a community is key to supporting women in tech. To that end, we are excited to announce a new collaborative resource. Women Techmakers is launching a new scholarship for women in tech around the world to increase their skills through enrolling in an online technical degree - the Women Techmakers Udacity Scholarship. Women Techmakers, Google's global program for women in technology, provides visibility, community and resources for women and allies around the world. Women Techmakers has partnered with Udacity, one of the world's leading online training platforms, as Udacity's flagship partner for women in technology to provide this scholarship to women across experience levels and geographies.

    This new scholarship provides the opportunity for women to earn online certification in Android Basics , Android Developer, Front-End Web Developer and Full-Stack Developer, all courses co-designed by Google experts, and includes opportunities for women at multiple skill levels. Benefits include special access to a community of Googlers and a cross-cohort global online community. Upon completion of the Nanodegree within one year, scholars will receive certification from Udacity, a certificate of completion from Women Techmakers, a resume review by a Googler, and more.

    This scholarship is the newest offering in a portfolio of Women Techmakers programs to support women and allies globally, including Membership for curated, personalized professional support, our video series and guides on building inclusive tech hubs, and our Scholars program, which provides funding and support for university women studying computer science.

    Click here to learn more and apply by June 9th, 2017.

    Categories: Programming